Saturday, May 23, 2009

A Scathingly Brilliant Idea

Mrs. Hillbilly Mom had the most scathingly brilliant idea this afternoon. Or not. It was right after reading the current edition of her Missouri teacher's organization magazine. Seems they are accepting personal essays for next year's magazine. And Mrs. Hillbilly Mom thought, "Who has more things personal to say than ME?" So she is seriously considering a submission. Don't cost nothin'. But they might expect proper grammar and sentences that don't have prepositions where the end is at.

Oh, Mrs. Hillbilly Mom could not write a personal essay that's all touchy-feely, about how she has learned so much about patience and individual differences and the innate goodness of each and every child she has had the pleasure to touch lives with. There goes that pesky preposition issue again. No, Mrs. Hillbilly Mom would march to a different drummer. She would share her wealth of common knowledge imparted upon her by her students over the many years her career has spanned. If it were a bridge, Mrs. HM's career would be on par with the Golden Gate Bridge, though some may compare it to the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, including its unique history.

Yes, Mrs. HM may just polish up some words of wisdom her students have given her over the years. Facts from the Encyclopedia of Common Knowledge. And also beauty tips that have been offered to Mrs. HM from her students, like the haircutting discussion earlier this year.

You never know what might tickle an editor's fancy. You never know if Mrs. Hillbilly Mom would blow her cover and have to give up her blog.

2 comments:

DeadpanAnn said...

Don't cost nothin'. But they might expect proper grammar and sentences that don't have prepositions where the end is at.That's what I call talent.

I don't think your blog would be exposed because of that. Just don't forget what you're doing and sign it "Hillbilly Mom."

Hillbilly Mom said...

Miss Ann,
It's not like they'd pick mine anyway. It's a quarterly magazine, and I doubt that I would be one of the four chosen.

In keeping with my prepositional faux pas: I don't think I have anything to worry about.